Through The Eyes Of A GP Of Over Fifty Years

The first part of this video is a trip down memory lane for me. I happen to share the same generation as Dr. Vernon Coleman, and his description of how it used to be is exactly right.

Like him I too remember going to the doctor with my mother (it was in the back room of the local grocery shop). No appointments needed; when you went into the consulting room it was dimly lit and full of smoke from the Senior Service fag that was permanently in the corner of Dr. Davies’ mouth, whilst he squinted down with one eye closed to his desk to write your prescription. Give me a dedicated man like who smelled like a smoked kipper, any day, than the dandy little woke types who would go into a snowflake’s hysterical fit at the thought of such a scenario. They seem to be more intent on what the job gives them in their little politically correct world, than what their job can do for your health as their patient.

Like Dr. Coleman I was brought up in a secluded, rural area of the country, where not everyone had mains electricity. The doctor knew everyone in an eight mile radius of his surgery, and yes, he also attended to you at home or in the surgery. If ever you went into hospital, on your return he would do house visits to your home to keep an eye on you. He was on call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year in all weathers. He knew you and your family intimately – back three or four generations.

The deterioration in care for patients has nose dived in the last forty years. It is now at a low ebb. The perfect excuse to do less hours, get more money and do even less for you in the wake of the hoax pandemic which has highlighted the betrayal of patients. These modern doctors (but not all of them in fairness) no longer view their work as a vocation. They desperately need a crash refresher course in what being a doctor is actually about.

But let Dr. Coleman fill in the rest of the gaps for you:


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